VOL. II NO. 11                                        May 30, 2007
MAY 30, 2007
STORIES AND COLUMNS
Special Graduation Issue

*
The Literary Divide: Hats off to Walter Lane for a job well done!
by Paul Barrows

*
UW Law School's KaShia Moua: A commitment to change,
by Jonathan Gramling

*
Edgewood College's Charles Davis: The world at his doorstep,
by Jonathan Gramling

*
Alison Bowman: Pride of the tribe,
by Laura Salinger

*
Asian Wisconzine: AIA celebrates its graduates and achievers,
by Heidi M. Pascual
(
www.asianwisconzine.com)

*
Simple Things: Whale of a bad time,
by Lang Kenneth Haynes

*
Politicas de hoy: La juventud, nuestro tesoro,
por Alfonso Zepeda Capistran

*
MATC's Ebony Bivens,
by Laura Salinger

*
Jumpstart's impact,
by Phueng Cha

*
UW's Jennifer Knox and Gerardo Mancilla: Advocating for others,
by Kiera Wiatrak

SPECIAL FEATURE:
*
The 2007 HUES' Row of Excellence
pp 1-8,
by Jonathan Gramling

*
China Dispatch: A trip to Huangshan,
by Andrew Gramling

*
Peggy Choy: Precise expression (2),
by Jonathan Gramling

*
Madison All-City American Indian & Alaskan Native Graduation,
by Jonathan Gramling

*
JADA's Soul Food and catering,
by Jonathan Gramling
UP and Away with PEOPLE
PEOPLE Program is fulfilling its promise at
UW-Madison
      During his remarks, he continuously challenged the graduates to step up and be leaders in their communities and to help prepare those who will come behind them.  "As we talk about developing leaders for tomorrow's challenges, we sometimes feel that this person or that person has the ability to lead," James said.  "A great legacy is not good enough. We cannot stand around and brag about a good fight. That's just not good      enough. You should be prepared to fight a good fight. If you see a good fight, get in it. It simply means 'Don't go picking a fight, join it and help some of the good fights that are right there in your own  backyard.'"
      "When developing others to follow in your footsteps, develop leaders who are about business, strength, not easily bought or sold, leaders who will lead and make decisions when others cannot and when others won't," James continued. "Develop leaders who will not sell out to the country club memberships. Build leaders to win  and leaders who don't mind stepping up to the plate of life, leaders who don't fear success and not failure. You must have the focus and vision of a leader. You must understand that as leaders the impact that our decisions have on others."
      Dextra Hadnot, AT&T director of external affairs, also honed in on the leadership theme during his remarks. "You have to be responsible," Hadnot emphasized to the graduates. "You have to be leaders. You have to be moral agents. You have to do what society needs. The things that are going on today will be on your shoulders to make happen, and that is to lead good positive lives,  run businesses, go to church and keep that going, doing all of the things that need to be done."
      "Many of you know the things that are happening in the world that cause our society to crumble," Hadnot continued. "That is what you are going to be entering into. You're going to have to find a role in that to make things better for us all. I hate to lay that heavy burden on you. But that's something you took on the day you came to this university because in as much as you came here to have fun, you also came here to be serious and successful. Some of you may be surprised that day when the chancellor and all of the associate chancellors hand you a diploma and you graduated, they'repushing you out of the door. They're saying  'We're done. We did out part.' And Cleveland is saying 'We're done. I did my part.' Jackie is saying 'We're done. We did our part. We sheltered you. We nurtured you. We guided you.' And you took it on and you succeeded. I'm here to tell you that this university has gotten with you and now you need to get with it."
      In closing, Hadnot gave the graduates some words of advice. "Hold onto your faith and if you don't have one, find it," Hadnot emphasized. "Make sure that you build family because that is very important. Love and respect your parents, your friends and everyone who has gotten you to this point. Grow up beyond today because you are going to have to. Be responsible leaders. Be moral agents. And be successful."
      The 13 students who graduated the weekend of May 19 are just the beginning trickle of what is hoped to be a torrent of students of color who have found success on the UW-Madison campus. Success is looming on the horizon.
By Jonathan Gramling
      It started out as a trickle about nine years ago when the first high school students of color from Milwaukee came to the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus during the summer as a part of the PEOPLE Program. Back then, it was a little more than a thought and a dream,      to expand the pipeline of students of color entering UW-Madison. And now that trickle has turned into a river as approximately 1,000 PEOPLE Program  students from elementary, middle and high schools across Wisconsin will be participating in summer educational activities. And more and more students are entering UW-Madison.
      And now, the trickle of PEOPLE Program participants who are graduating from UW-Madison has commenced. First it was five students in 2006. And now, 13 PEOPLE Program Scholars graduated during the spring commemcement.
      On May 18, PEOPLE held a College Scholars Graduation Recognition Banquet for the 13 pioneers who have spearheaded the way for the thousands of students who will come behind them. Raven Berry, Marande Buck, Jessica Dickerson, Mohammed Farhoud, Dina Garcia, Marcela   Garcia, Krystal Howard, Ayodeji Ijoala, Rashonda Jones, Christopher Lee, Krystal Ratliff, Saif Syed, and Tiffany Tardy received recognition, gifts and certificates from the PEOPLE Program staff and heavy applause from the family members and friends who came to wish them well.
      Cleveland James, former admissions director at UW-Madison and one of the architects of the PEOPLE Program, was on hand to mark the occasion as its keynote speaker. Before the festivities began, James recalled in an interview with The Capital City Hues how the PEOPLE Program got started.
      "David Ward called me to his office about 2-3 months after I arrived here in the Admissions office," James recalled.  "He said 'Cleveland, we    understand that you had a great relationship with Milwaukee when you were at UW-Whitewater. However, we being the flagship campus and known for anything you can think of can't surpass the success you had at UW-Whitewater when it comes to attracting academically-talented students to the university. What would you suggest we do?' And while I was certainly thrilled that he recognized some of the success I had at      Whitewater, I was a little leery as to how it could happen here. They had a big recruiting machine here and they had people in place to do the kind of things that certainly should have been able to surpass anything we did at Whitewater. But they just had not succeeded."
     "So we started a conversation and talked about what we would do," James continued.  "I said  'Allow me the opportunity to set up a meeting with all of the 18 Milwaukee public high schools, with all of their principals.' David looked at me and said  'Can you do that?' I replied 'Well, you asked me and I said this is what we will do.' As I was talking about that, he said 'What should I do?' I said  'I need access to your calendar.' I think  Maria was his secretary at that time. I said  'If I have access, I think we can pull it off.' We called MPS and they said they could do it. We went over there. There were some things he could defend and there were things that he couldn't defend and things he could say that were wrong and things he said we needed to improve. And from that drive back from Milwaukee came the PEOPLE Program."
Homepage
Archives